401K

Sizing Up Your 401(k)

When did you last evaluate your company’s retirement plan? If you’re like many people, your 401(k) or profit-sharing plan constitutes the largest – or at least one of the largest – investment accounts in your portfolio. Here’s how to make sure it’s the best plan for you.

Many factors help you evaluate your plan, including the total expenses, investment options, guidance provided and your company match.

Dividing Nest Egg in Divorce

Divorcing couples often face the need to split up some retirement account assets. There are  two ways to divide retirement money in a divorce, depending on the type of account: Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO) and transfer incident to a divorce.

Getting the Most From a 401(k)

The 401(k) retirement plan, which your employer sponsors, is now ubiquitous in U.S. workplaces, with 51 million people signed up. But too few investors understand these vehicles. Here is an owners’ manual, vital for your financial well-being.

Why Switch to a Roth 401(k)?

Beginning in 2013, you could roll over all your standard 401(k) funds to a Roth account in the same retirement plan. But such a move may not be good for you. While the upside of a Roth is tax-free money in the future, converting creates an extra tax burden today.

$ Tips for Your Grown Kids

Early summer’s cap and gown now hang in the closet and you just hope your suddenly grown child is ready for real-world financial challenges, from debt to saving for a remote retirement. Now more than ever, you can teach your kid many key money lessons.

Rules for a Roth 401(k)

If your employer sponsors a 401(k) plan for you to participate in, you may also have a Roth 401(k) option. Electing that option depends on your other retirement plans, tax outlook and many other factors.

Traditional or Roth IRA?

Saving for retirement means you must sort out countless and confusing options from 401(k)s to individual retirement accounts. How much you make and whether you’re self-employed or have a company-sponsored retirement plan are just a few criteria to determine which to chose. One of your first questions: What’s the difference between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA?

Many clients at our firm ask this when looking to maximize retirement savings. To understand which option may be better, let’s look at the differences and nuances between the two types of accounts.

What to Do With an Old 401(k)

It’s a question my clients ask me all the time: “What should I do with my old 401(k)?” When you change jobs, you can keep your 401(k) where it is, or roll it to other accounts.

Let’s examine your choices:

Roll your 401(k) to an individual retirement account is usually the default option I recommend to clients. Flexibility is the primary reason.

Staying on Top of a 401(k)

Lots of investors never bother to check on their 401(k) regularly. But you should keep a constant eye on your funds’ risk level, whether your asset allocation is out of whack and if your beneficiaries still are the ones you want.

When you first start a job and join a 401(k) or another employer-sponsored retirement savings plan, you fill out a few forms, decide how much you want to contribute, and you pick some investment options.

Allocation in Your 401(k)

When you participate in your employer-sponsored retirement plan, your must first determine how much money to put into the plan. Next: Allocate funds within your account to make the most money. This can be the tricky part.

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