AdviceIQ Articles

  • Stop Applying Biz Band-Aids

    Problems crop up in all businesses. Here’s how to prevent the same problems from rearing their heads over and over.

    Do you feel like you’re stuck in the movie Groundhog Day? The same thing happens over and over? Like you get past a problem and a year or two later the same problem comes back again?

    You think you solved the problem last time. You didn’t and you fear it’s going to continue like this forever.

  • The Bullish Case for 2014

    Statistically, 2014 looks good. On average since 1926, the Standard & Poor’s 500 total return, which includes dividends, advanced by roughly 11.5% the year after a 20% or greater advance. Absent a steep and unlikely late-December slump, this year is on track to finish well above 20%.

  • The Questions Advisors Ask

    You or your financial advisors rely on many tools to explore and improve your financial situation. Here’s why one of the most critical is curiosity.

    Financial planning software abounds for financial planners and individuals. To me, asking questions and the dialog they create might constitute the most important financial planning tool.

    When I first speak with you, the prospective client, either in person on the phone, I ask many questions.

  • Prepping for a Hazy Future

    Your future arrives before you know it. But since we can’t predict what it will bring, how do we prepare for it? By making plans and doing that as early as possible. Here are some wise words to help you seize your moment financially:

    “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”Benjamin Franklin.

  • China and Its Debt Woes

    If the United States relies on China as its main lender, what happens when China is having difficulties with its debt? Perhaps the world’s second largest economy is not as inexorable as advertised.

    We may soon find out how the debt problem will evolve. As the Financial Times reported, “several banks have had to delay or dramatically reduce Chinese bond issues as the impact of a tight onshore credit market begins to be felt.”

  • Need a Planner or a Manager?

    If the terms “financial planner” and “investment manager” seem interchangeable to you, know that many people — even financial professionals — goof in differentiating. Understand the difference to maximize your financial well-being, and here’s how.

    Confusion reigns because the terms don’t just describe job titles; they refer to distinct parts of the integrated financial processes of financial planning and investment management.

  • Loved Ones’ Money Problems

    Many loved ones have a debt problem. If they are not responsible around money, do not be shy: Confront them with their problems and help them find solutions.

    When I was a kid my father bought me every G.I. Joe I wanted and I thought nothing of it. My father did anything to support me. He never hesitated to tell me how much he loved me and I always let him know how much I loved him back.

  • The Bull Meets the FUD Factor

    As the stock market keeps advancing, we once again encounter the FUD Factor – fear, uncertainty, and doubt. In other words, anxiety over whether and how long the good times can persevere.

    In November, as key market indexes hit record highs and showed no signs of stopping soon, perfectly sensible questions arose. Should I take some money off the table? Is the market poised for a pullback? Is it risky to invest when the market is so high?

  • Advisor Types: What’s Real?

    When you hire someone to advise you about finances, and he calls himself a “financial advisor,” what does that mean? Answer: not much. Anyone can open an office and call himself a financial advisor. That’s just marketing hype.

    There are only three terms that matter about people who provide financial advice: a Registered Representative, a Registered Investment Adviser and a financial planner. To function under these names, an adviser must pass a grueling series of tests, and is regulated.

  • Other Life Policy: Annuities

    Life insurance buys financial protection against your premature death. Here’s the how-to on another insurance that protects you from living too long: the annuity.

    Annuities often secure steady cash flow to you during your retirement years through growing invested funds. The payout process is known as annuitization.

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