AdviceIQ Articles

  • Is Alternative Investing OK?

    Once only available to institutions and wealthy individuals, alternative investments – basically securities that do not trade on any exchange – are winning a broader appeal, according to a panel of advisors.

    The goal of using alternative investments is to diversify a portfolio or to lessen its risk. These vehicles tend to be illiquid, meaning they are difficult to trade. They can only be sold to others via financial institutions.

  • How to Avoid Financial Scams

    It’s easy for investors to become a con artist’s mark, according to financial advisors. Many of the victims scammed in Bernie Madoff’s $65 billion Ponzi scheme were sophisticated at investing. Very sophisticated. One such person – a former trader – invested because he played basketball with Madoff’s accountant.

    If successful people are prone to invest in fraudulent private companies, what is the common investor to do? Is there any hope for the average person to invest in private companies and not be ripped off? Here are some tips and red flags to look for before investing.

  • The Advisor Team Approach

    The do-it-all professional who plans your financial future appears as quaint – and rare – these days as the old country doctor who cured all ills. Today’s good advisors can help you sort out your myriad money details by tapping a network of experts in law, estate planning, taxes, insurance and other fields.

  • How to Afford Retirement

    The methods of building a secure retirement income, which include wise use of Social Security and amassing sufficient savings, are complex. A smart financial planner can help you do it, according to a panel of advisors.

  • A Week Focused on Advisors

    AdviceIQ has a central credo: Everyone should have a financial advisor. But not just any advisor – a good advisor, and the right one for you. So for one week in New York’s Times Square, Sept. 15-19, our company, AIQ Inc. put on National Financial Advisor Week.

    This was an intensively practical forum to inform the public about personal finance – about how to deal with matters that affect their lives, ranging from funding a retirement to paying for higher education. And about how to get the best guidance on these crucial issues.

  • What Is Your Risk Tolerance?

    How do assess your stomach for risk in investments? By looking at when you need the money and your spending habits, a panel of advisors said. But the current market’s situation also is a factor in investors’ capacity for risk.

    “The time to worry is when no one is worried about risk,” said Don Hutchinson, senior vice president of Goelzer Investment Management.

  • Improving Your Credit Score

    Your credit score is like the GPA of your finances. To get better financial options in the future, you should know your credit score and how you can improve it if necessary.

    Your credit score plays a role in almost every financial aspect of your life. Banks check your credit score to determine whether or not to approve you for credit and how much you pay in interest charges. Your landlord may ask for your credit score for your lease application, and more and more employers are interested in it as a way to measure how responsible you are.

  • Boom Times for the Repo Man

    The good news for the economy is that consumers are buying more. The bad news is that they’re not paying for what they buy. Debt delinquencies are surging, and so are collection agencies.

  • Getting Free Advisor Help

    Financial advisors are not just for the wealthy. If anything, the financially insecure need advisors more. If you can’t afford one, the good news is, free advisory services exist to help you stand on your feet.

    “We do tons of planning for people with very limited assets,” said Anthony Canale, president of the Financial Planning Association, New York Chapter, during a panel discussion.

  • Retiring Mortgage Free

    How often do you think about paying off the mortgage? Retirement may be harder if you still have debt. Ideally, you should enter retirement as free from a mortgage as possible. Here’s why and how.

    Not having a mortgage reduces your overhead. That is to say, you need less money to live. You lower your personal break-even point. With limited income in retirement, this is always a good thing. Say your mortgage is $1,500 per month. If you pay it off before you retire, you have $18,000 more per year in your pocket.

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