AdviceIQ Articles

  • Top Mistakes Investors Make

    Investors are human and they make lots of mistakes. A panel at National Financial Advisors Week spotlighted some of these errors and had some good tips on how to avoid them.

    When the stock market goes south is when a lot of mistakes occur. “History shows we are overdue for a correction,” noted David Callaway, editor-in chief of USA Today and the panel’s moderator.

  • How’s Your Emergency Fund?

    Financial planners commonly recommend you keep an easily accessible emergency fund for unexpected expenses. Too bad few people do it. Take steps now to avoid being caught short of money.

    More than a third (34%) of 2,000 adults recently had an unexpected event such as a medical problem or a home-related expense that set them back financially, according to a national survey by Pew Research.

  • Acrophobia at Market Highs

    Despite a small slide in September and recent days' whipsawing, U.S. stocks remain near their all-time high. Should you worry that this bull market is ending? No. Such records are meaningless. Moreover, there’s a leeriness in the air – call it acrophobia, or fear of market heights – which usually is the opposite of a signal that a rally is doomed.

  • Invest in Private Companies?

    Should you invest in non-public companies? A lot of people are doing that, via privately issued equities and debt instruments; hedge funds, venture capital funds and limited partnerships are also popular non-public companies.

    This trend includes a broad swath of industries, just not tech companies. Banking is the largest in dollar terms. An advisor presentation on private investing, as part of National Financial Advisor Week, noted that this arena is an increasingly popular and profitable one.

  • More Than an Advisor

    Great advisors not only help you with complex financial decisions, but they are your friends who support you for decades. My former business partner and mentor, George Chell, is a shining example.

    I was in a cab, returning to our ship after a day of touring Belfast, Ireland, when I received a text from my father: “George passed away this morning.” He was 92.

    I last saw George this past October, when he drove to my office, and we went to lunch. We ended our lunch the way we always did for the past 33 years, playing Liar’s Poker to see who would pay the tab.

  • Boost Stocks as You Age?

    The standard investment advice is to decrease your portfolio’s stock allocation as you get older, because equities are riskier than bonds and cash – and you don’t want a bear market to devour your retirement nest egg when you need it. But now, there’s research showing that it is safer if you increase your stock exposure.

    Trouble is, this approach doesn’t give you any better results, according to my analysis.

  • Envisioning Your Success

    One of the big plusses of entrepreneurship: It allows you to be creative, test new ideas and have fun with your business. In fact, simplicity and fun may be one of your best avenues to innovate and grow your enterprise.

    Recently I signed out of email for the afternoon, turned on the radio and busted out my old magazines, a glue stick and scissors to create a good old-fashioned vision board. I loved making collages as a teenager; anything I could glue down seemed fun and artsy.

  • Getting Investing Discipline

    Saving money is like exercising. Often when people start saving late in life, just like in exercising, they try to do too much too fast. When that happens, pain is often the result, and they quit.

    When saving money, if you put away too much too fast and it hurts your lifestyle, you likely stop saving. In both situations, your health (financial and physical) is worsened.

  • Fed’s Murky Rate Language

    The word for today is “considerable,” as in the Federal Reserve’s recurring statement that interest rates will remain low for “a considerable time.” But how long is “a considerable time”? The deliberate murkiness of this phrase, like much else the central bank says, is maddening.

  • Protecting Inherited IRAs

    Your own individual retirement account is generally exempt from the reach of creditors, but an inherited account may not be. If you plan to pass on an IRA to heirs, read on to learn how to better safeguard the money.

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